Posted by: Indonesian Children | June 15, 2009

Breastfeeding May Help Protect Against A Childhood Sleep-Related Breathing Disorder

source : http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/

A childhood sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) is known to have negative consequences on cognitive development, behavior, quality of life and utilization of health care resources. However, a research abstract presented at SLEEP 2007, the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS), finds that breastfeeding may provide long-term protection against the incidence or severity of a childhood SRBD.

The study, conducted by Hawley E. Montgomery-Downs, PhD, of West Virginia University, focused on the parents of those children who underwent overnight polysomnography, who filled out a brief survey about whether the child had been breast, formula or both breast and formula fed as an infant. There were 197 surveys completed. The average age of the children at the time of polysomnography was 6.7 years. Fifty-two percent of them were formula fed, 10 percent breast fed and 38 percent both breast and formula fed as infants. It was discovered that children who were breast fed for at least two months as infants had lower rates and less severe measures of an SRBD, and that breast feeding beyond two months provided additional benefits for reduced disorder severity.

“Prevention of a childhood sleep-related breathing disorder is critically important because the approximately three percent of children who are unable to breathe well while sleeping suffer from frequent sleep interruption and intermittent hypoxia that negatively impacts their cardiovascular function, cognitive development, behavior, quality of life, and utilization of healthcare resources,” said Dr Montgomery-Downs. “The benefits of breast feeding in our study may be due to the protection against early viral infection that breast feeding provides, or they may be due to the healthful jaw formation that is a result of breast feeding. Investigation of these mechanisms will be the topics of future work. The current findings support another benefit of infant breast feeding.”

An SRBD may be a problem in more than 10 percent of children. It occurs when the airway is partially blocked during sleep. The most common example is snoring. The most severe form of an SRBD is obstructive sleep apnea. It occurs in about one percent to two percent of children

Parents who suspect that their child might be suffering from an SRBD, or another sleep disorder, are encouraged to consult with their child’s pediatrician, who will refer them to a sleep specialist.

The annual SLEEP meeting brings together an international body of 5,000 leading researchers and clinicians in the field of sleep medicine to present and discuss new findings and medical developments related to sleep and sleep disorders.

More than 1,000 research abstracts were presented at the SLEEP meeting, a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society. The four-day scientific meeting brought to light new findings that enhance the understanding of the processes of sleep and aid the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders such as insomnia, narcolepsy and sleep apnea

 

 

Supported  by

INDONESIA BRESTFEEDING NETWORK

Breast is the Best ! What could be more natural?

Yudhasmara Foundation

Office ; JL Taman Bendungan Asahan 5 Jakarta Indonesia 10210

phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 5703646

email : judarwanto@gmail.com,

http://supportbreastfeeding.wordpress.com/

 

editor in Chief :

Dr WIDODO JUDARWANTO

email : judarwanto@gmail.com

 

 

 

Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a medical or health condition. You should carefully read all product packaging. If you have or suspect you have a medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider.

Copyright © 2009, Indonesia Breastfeeding Networking  Information Education Network. All rights reserved.


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